Home   What's On   Film   Article

French Films in the frame


By David Porter


The 27th edition of the French Film Festival UK opens next week at the Aberdeen Belmont Filmhouse.

The festival continues to be at the forefront of Francophone cinema promoting a spirit of friendship and collaboration with colleagues and film-makers across Europe and beyond.Paradoxically given the mood of current times, the Europe-friendly Festival began in a spirit of optimism in December 1992, the same year Edinburgh hosted the Summit of the European Council.

Funding was awarded for an arts festival giving a cultural reference to the occasion - and the French Film Festival was one of the beneficiaries.

Almost three decades down the line, the Festival has proved the worth of that investment and confidence: the event now takes place in more than 35 different locations across the UK with an all-embracing range of films, seasons, and programmes for all ages and tastes, many accompanied by guests or highlighted by specialist introductions or workshops.

Highlights include French box-office smashing Alice and the Mayor which will open the festival in Glasgow, and I Lost My Body comes to Aberdeen following its excellent response at the 2019 Canne Film Festival.

Each screening throughout the Festival will be preceded by a short film on the theme of human rights, shot on a mobile phone or tablet as part of a continuing collaboration with the Paris-based Mobile Film Festival.

Festival Director and co-Founder,Richard Mowe,commented: “We are thrilled to have one of the most varied and vibrant programmes ever at this year’s French Film Festival.

“The French Film Festival's work illustrates that culture and human understanding and cooperation ignores current political vagaries and knows no boundaries.

“The French Film Festival will surely be one of the first major arts events in the UK to demonstrate its ongoing support for cultural exchange with continental Europe and beyond post-Brexit.

The 27th edition of the French Film Festival UK runs at the Belmont till November 20.

Highlights include - Monday, November 11, 6pm -Alice and the Mayor.

Nicolas Pariser delivers a very clever and quirky political comedy, with brilliant performances from Luchini and Demoustier exploring how we live through the filter of two generations.

The Conviction which will be shown at the Belmont Cinema, Aberdeen.
The Conviction which will be shown at the Belmont Cinema, Aberdeen.

Tuesday, November 12, 8.45pmConviction.

Antoine Raimbault feature debut,based on a much-publicised French murder trial of Jacques Viguier.

Tuesday, November 19, 6pm -The Swimming Pool.

A classic 1969 tour de force of erotic languor turning into fear and horror.

For the full programme, venues and booking information visit www.frenchfilmfestival.org.uk.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More